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Nancy Green - Aunt Jemima Lost to Cancel Culture

Written by Laura Brown

I strongly disagree with cancel culture, book burning, etc. History doesn't go away just because people don't like it. Young people won't know Nancy Green because she was removed from the syrup bottles. So they won't see her and think to find out who she was. She becomes lost to history, because she was black, not because she wasn't worth remembering.

Posted by Terry Quinn on Facebook: Nancy Green the Real Aunt Jemima

The branding of the syrup was a tribute to this woman’s gifts and talents. The world knew her as “Aunt Jemima”, but her given name was Nancy Green and she was a true American success story. She was born a slave in 1834 Montgomery County, Kentucky. and became a wealthy superstar in the advertising world, as its first living trademark. Green was 56-yrs old when she was selected as spokesperson for a new ready-mixed, self-rising pancake flour and made her debut in 1893 at a fair and exposition in Chicago. She demonstrated the pancake mix and served thousands of pancakes, and became an immediate star.

She was a good storyteller, her personality was warm and appealing, and her showmanship was exceptional. Her exhibition booth drew so many people that special security personnel were assigned to keep the crowds moving. Nancy Green was signed to a lifetime contract, traveled on promotional tours all over the country, and was extremely well paid. Her financial freedom and stature as a national spokesperson enabled her to become a leading advocate against poverty and in favor of equal rights for all Americans. She maintained her job until her death in 1923, at age 89. This was a remarkable woman, and sadly she has been ERASED by politics. I wanted you to know and remind you in this cancel culture time period.

Canadian Clock Museum

Written by Laura Brown

Galleries and a virtual tour. The museum is located in Deep River, Ontario, if you want to make a road trip and visit them.

"Showcasing the heritage of Canada's many clock manufacturers and sellers from the early 1800s to the present time.

See and hear more than just clocks, because we have lots of period artifacts, including some really old record players that work without electricity! Hear century-old Edison cylinder records on a 1920 floor model player. Be amazed by the incredible sound from our 1927 Victor top-of-the-line CREDENZA Victrola floor model 78s records player that was sold in Ottawa and cost the same as a Ford car back then!"

Horological - means of or relating to devices or sciences of measuring time.